Feng Shui Door Facing North - Front Door Colors

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Feng Shui Door Facing North

The front door is considered "the mouth of chi" in feng shui, which means it is the mouth of energy, or the source that infuses all the other parts of your house with good things. Because the front door is so important, it is the best place to start if you want to get rapid results from your feng shui improvements. And of all the improvements you can make to a front entrance, the most dramatic one is to paint your front door the right color. Here is how to choose what that color should be.

What Determines Door Color

What color you should paint your door depends primarily on which direction it points. Some directions are better for entrances than others, so while painting your door the right color will help, with some directions you are going to need some "feng shui extra credit" to really get your entrance humming with good energy.

The second most important requirement is to pick a color that will bring the sort of change you want in your life. Finally, no matter what the feng shui rules say, your door color should be a color that is pleasing to you. If your door meets all the feng shui guidelines, but every time you walk up to it you frown, then your attitude and your energy will be bad. The idea is to pick a color that is the best possible compromise between all three goals.

The Ideal Colors by Direction

North facing doors are not auspicious in feng shui. They need all the "umph" they can get, so a red door is best. Add brighter lights and shiny metal details to get the extra boost you need. Make sure the path to the door is as wide and obvious as possible. Feng Shui Door Facing North

North-West facing doors benefit from the leadership and organization "father" energy of the North-West direction. Good colors here are red, black or grey. Use shiny metal fittings to emphasize the metal energy coming from the West.

West facing doors can also be black, grey and red, and should have the same metal fittings as North and North-West facing doors. This direction is good if you crave romance or to increase your income.

By the time we reach the South-West direction, the energy has changed, but the best door colors are still black, grey and red. Rustier, earth-toned reds would work well here. If you tend to be anxious or feel any kind of instability in your life put out a bowl of sea salt near the door to keep you grounded.

South facing doors are high-energy, good for getting attention, but sometimes so active that they lead to arguments and conflict. If things are feeling a little too intense, putting out a bowl of charcoal by the door will cool things down, as will painting the door black. Good colors for South facing doors include any shade of green, blue or purple.

South-East doors are very good for communication and steady progress. Paint them dark green, cream or blue and use low-gloss or wooden fittings.

If you are young or upwardly mobile, you want an East-facing door. This direction is especially good for launching a new career or a new business. Paint your door bright green or cream to maximize the effect and use low-gloss or wood for your doorknob and knocker.

North-East, unfortunately, is not at all a good direction for an entrance. It can even lead to health problems if you are not shielded. The energy from this direction is generally unstable and sharp, so you want to repel it by painting your front door white with a high-gloss paint. Metal details at the entrance will help, as will bushy landscaping plants and putting a bowl of sea salt just inside the door to quell the piercing energy. Feng Shui Door Facing North

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This article was published on 2010/09/26